1982: The American Model: Contents, Index, Contributors

NET-1982-TAM-cvr-frt-001
The American Model conference was held at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, from 9 to 12 May, 1979. Later, in 1982, Joan Kirkby (the conference organiser, and an American, brought up in Boise, Idaho) organised for most of the papers delivered there to be published as a book: The American model : influence and independence in Australian poetry, Edited by Joan Kirkby. Published Sydney, N.S.W. : Hale & Iremonger, 1982. Physical Description xiv, 178 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm. Subjects: Poets, Australian, 20th century. Poets, American. Australian poetry, 20th century, History and criticism. Contents: Includes index. Notes: Papers presented at a poetry conference held at Macquarie University, Sydney, 9 to 12 May, 1979. Libraries Australia ID 9366302.

This is the Contents page of that book;
[»»] following is the Index, and after that,
[»»] the List of Contributors.
NET-1982-TAM-cvr-bak-002

Contents

   vii      Illustrations [ 2]

    ix      Contributors [This file]

    ix      Preface [ 3]

  xiii      Acknowledgments [ 4]

      1      Joan Kirkby: Introduction [ 5]

    14      Galway Kinnell: Walt Whitman’s poetic line [ 6]

    28      Thomas Shapcott: Beware of broken glass [ 7]

    42      Chris Wallace-Crabbe: The Quaker graveyard in Carlton [ 8]

    54      Andrew Taylor: Penelope or Circe? [ 9]

    69      Louis Simpson : William Carlos Williams [10]

    84      Fay Zwicky : The ethnic strain [11]

    99      John Tranter: Anaesthetics [12]

  117      Robert Gray: Poetry and living [13]

  137      Vincent Buckley: Ease of American language [14]

  160      Bruce Dawe: Public voices and private feeling [15]

  193      Index [nil — see Contributors]

Index

Page numbers in [bold] in square brackets refer to illustrations.

ADAMSON, Robert 56, 99, 100, 103, 115

AESTHETICISM 9, 48, 99, 117, 121

AESTHETICS 99;

    as parts to whole 115;

    as parts to as ethics 117-118, 121

AIKEN, Conrad 166

ALLEN, Donald, The New American Poetry 5, 35, 56, 60, 99, 103

ALLOTT, Kenneth, Contemporary Verse 33

AMERICA, criticism of 59, 98, 122-123;

    foreign 3, 12-13, 36, 44, 47, 51, 53;

    Kinship 4, 55, 165-166

AMERICAN LITERATURE, characteristics of:

    ease of movement 137-159

    perception and sensation 137-159

AMERICAN POETRY, characteristics of:

    a-social, unrepressed 53

    concern for unexceptional people 165, 172

    diversity 6, 13, 47, 64, 162

    ease of movement: see AMERICAN LITERATURE, ease of

    exoticism 5, 47, 49

    experimentalism 6, 51

    factuality, particularity 9, 14, 17, 20, 22, 25, 73, 78, 124, 128, 133, 138, 149

    familiar, everyday life 3, 55, 76, 79-80, 128

    force, passion, raw subjectivity 36, 39-41, 51

    garrulity, otherdirected 3, 84-86

    idiom and diction 40, 137-159

    idiosyncracy 7, 51

    influence of 4, 9, 40, 43, 47, 62, 64, 136, 159-161, 172

    language 33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 55, 78, 127, 137-159

    long poem 61, 64, 157

    mobility 148, 149, 151

    naturalness 137, 138, 142, 143

    pace 138, 142, 145, 158, 159

    perception: see AMERICAN LITERATURE, perception and sensation

    philosophical 159

    possibilities 10, 67

    process 36, 61, 143, 144, 150

    regionalism 6, 49, 73, 165

    sensation: see AMERICAN LITERATURE, perception and sensation

    sense perceptions 2-3, 6, 14, 20, 40, 124, 128, 133

    the self 6-7, 15, 17, 20-22, 26, 51, 53, 63, 84-85

    social awareness 3, 4, 6, 67, 84, 92-93, 95, 162, 165-172

    subjectivity, inwardness 3, 6, 51, 53, 62-64, 145

    tone 51, 79, 127, 159

    urbanization 4, 36, 64, 67, 68, 92, 93, 133, 170

    vulnerability as a stance 3, 6-8, 36, 39-41, 86, 121

AMERICAN POETRY, discrimination against 12-13, 44, 137

ANDERSON, Sherwood 161

ANGLO AMERICAN COLLABORATION 11

ANGLOPHILIA 5, 11, 12, 44, 55, 74, 84, 86, 90-92, 111, 137

ANGRY PENGUINS 161

ANTI-AESTHETICISM, ANAESTHETICS 9, 99-116

ANTI-AMERICANISM 12-13

ANTI-HUMANIST 107, 109, 115

ARISTOTLE 113

ARMSTRONG, Martin 161

ARNOLD, Matthew 76, 111

ART as changed way of seeing 28, 40

    as ethical force 80

    as intimate memory of nations (Murray) 53

    as true reflection of country’s psyche (Nowra) 13

ARTIST, as shepherd of being 118

ASHBERY, John 53, 62, 135

AUDEN, W. H. 2, 7, 30, 34, 51, 162

AUSTRALIAN LITERATURE, discrimination against 13, 137

    a-personal style, impersonality 7-8, 36, 63, 96

    conservatism 3, 5, 6, 104, 105

    discursive 6, 63

    hieratic literary speech 55

    irony 6, 8, 36, 61

    liberation of 43, 47, 64, 159

    solitary 84, 96

    suspicion of exhibitionism 7, 36

AUSTRALIAN SOCIETY Anglo-Saxon domination of 5, 84, 86, 91, 92

    colonialism 5, 33, 42, 115

    cultural cringe 13, 42

    cultural strut 42

    inhibitions 7-8, 169

    repression 5, 84-98

    reticence 86, 137, 169

BANNING, Lex 47

BARTHES, Roland 112

BEATLES 103

BEATS 9, 61, 70, 78

BEAVER, Bruce 36, 61, 99

BECKETT, Samuel 56

BELLOW, Saul 4, 84, [88], 89, 90, 91-92, 94-95, 96;

    Humboldt’s Gift, extracts 91-92, 94-95

BERRIGAN, Ted 135

BERRYMAN, John 51, 62, 63

BILLETER, Walter 99

BISHOP, Elizabeth 9, 33, 47, [58], 170

BLACK MOUNTAIN POETS 9, 39, 103, 149-150, 151, 154, 157

BLAKE, William 61, 157

BLY, Robert 5, 39, 62, 63, 165

BORGES, Jorge Luis 121

BOWEN, Marjorie 161-162

BRENNAN, Christopher 62

BUCKLEY, Vincent 2, 6, 10, 36, 61, 106-109, 111, [139], 162;

    ‘Ease of American language’ 137-159;

    excerpt from Golden Builders 107

BUCKMASTER, Charles 99, 100

BUNTING, Basil 11, 150

BURGESS, Anthony 39

BYRON, George, Lord 76

CAGE, John 78

CALVINISM 96

CAMPBELL, David 40

CAMUS, Albert 56

CATHER, Willa 138

CAVAFY, Constantine, 10, 60, 132

CEZANNE, Paul 129

CHAR, René, 10

CHEKHOV, Anton 3, 76, 133

CLASSICISM 104

COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor 64, 121, 145

COPYRIGHT 4, 11, 43-44

CRAIG, Alexander 6, 47, 137

CRANE, Hart 3, 51, 53, 60, [120], 121, 131, 138, 149, 150, 159

CREELEY, Robert 55, 128, 129, 150

CRITICISM, moral 106-109, 110, 111, 112, 115, 117-121

CULTURAL CRITICISM 67, 90

CULTURE, development of 42-44, 62, 73

CUMMINGS, E. E. 4, [32], 33, 34, 35, 51, 167, 168, 172;

    ‘Poem, or Beauty Hurts Mr. Vinal’ 167-168

CURTOIS, Greg 103

DARWIN, Charles The Origin of Species 2, 22

DAWE, Bruce 3, 4, 47,

    ‘Public voices and private feeling’ 160-172

DESCARTES, René 36

DEMUTH, Charles 70

DEWEY, John 73

DICKEY, James 39, 152;

    ‘The Sheep Child’ 153-154

DICKINSON, Emily 8, 16, 17, 33, 64, [65], 162

DISTRIBUTION: see COPYRIGHT

DONNE, John 157

DOOLITTLE, Hilda 69

DORN, Ed 30, 55, 150, 151, 154

DOS PASSOS, John 138, 149, 167

DOWSON, Ernest 49

DRANSFIELD, Michael 59, 99, 103

DREISER, Theodore 138

DRUGS 59, 104

DUGGAN, Laurie 99

DUNCAN, Robert 35, 39, 55, 129

DYLAN, Bob 103

DYSON-HUDSON, Neville 113, 114

ECLECTICISM 30, 35, 40, 41, 67

EDMONDS, Phillip 100

ELEGY 4, 166

ELIOT, T.S. 8, 25, 26, 29, 30, 35, 43, 55, 64, 69, 70, 73, 74, 103, 167

EMERSON, Ralph Waldo 7, 10

ENGLAND as parent culture 42-43, 47, 64, 137

ENGLISH COLONIAL POETIC TRADITION 5-6, 10-12, 69, 111, 115, 137

ENGLISH-LANGUAGE POETRY, traditional mode 107-109, 150

ENGLISH LITERATURE, as monolith 12

ENGLISH POETRY, characteristics of 5, 9, 42, 51, 106-109, 150

EVERGREEN REVIEW 56, 60

EXPRESSIONISM 105, 106

FACTIONALISM 10, 33, 35, 159

FAULKNER, William 2, 86, 89, 138-142, [140], 154;

    extract from As I Lay Dying 138-139

FAUST, Clive 99

FEARING, Kenneth

    ‘Dirge’ 168-169, 172

FIEDLER, Leslie 86, 97-98

FISHER, Roy 11

FORBES, John 99, 106-108, 115;

    ‘TV’; 107-108

FORD, Ford Maddox 135

FORMALIST POETRY 8, 9, 14, 19, 50, 53, 117, 150, 157, 167, 170, 172

FREE VERSE 14, 17

FREUD, Sigmund 42-43, 52

FRIENDLY STREET 60

FROST, Robert 8, 13, 34, 121, 166, 167

GIDE, André 43

GINSBERG, Allen 36, 55, 56, 59, [66], 70, 78, 85, 131, 132

GODZONE ARTICLES, Meanjin 13

GOETHE, Johann Wolfgang von 76, 109

GOLDEN, Harry 90, 91

GOULD, Alan 115

GRAVES, Robert 51, 110

GRAY, Robert 3, [119];

    ‘Poetry and living: an evaluation of the American poetic tradition’ 117-136

GREENE, Graham 161-162

HALL, Rodney 103

HAMBURGER, Michael 11

HAMMIAL, Philip 99

HARDY, Thomas 121

HARRISON-FORD, Carl 100, 103

HART, Kevin 115

HASKELL, Dennis 115

HAWTHORNE, Nathaniel 96

HAYWARD, John and Penguin Book of English Verse 161

HECHT, Ben 172

HEIDEGGER, Martin 56, 118

HEMENSLEY, Kris 99, 100, 106, 115

HEMINGWAY, Ernest 86, 89, 138, 154

HILL, Geoffrey 11, 150

HOPE, A.D. 40, 55, 104, 172

HOPKINS, Gerard Manley 34, 35

HORAN, Robert 47, 170;

    ‘Suppose We Kill a King’ 170-171

HUGHES, Ted 11, 150, 158

HULME, T.E. 135

HUTCHISON, Garrie 99

IMAGINATION, as awareness by analogy 118, 121

    geographical 150, 154

    historical 150, 157

IMAGISM 11, 63, 64, 135

IMITATION 35, 40, 136, 159

IMPRESSIONISM 135

INFLUENCE, nature of 160-161

INSULARITY 10, 29

IRONY 3, 8, 10, 33, 36, 50, 52, 61, 85

JARRELL, Randall 33, 34, 122

JEFFERS, Robinson 34, 49

JENKINS, John 99

JEWISH WRITERS 84, 85, 90-91, 95-98

JOHNSTON, Martin 99, 115

JONES, Rae Desmond 99, 109-111, 115;

    ‘The Front Window’ 109-110

JONSON, Ben 166

JOYCE, James 90

JUNG, C. G. 26

KEATS, John 69, 118

KENNER, Hugh 7

KENNY, Robert 99, 100

KEROUAC, Jack 56, 59

KEYES, Sidney 34

KEYSERLING, Hermann 73

KIERKEGAARD, Søren 56

KING, Alec 8

KINNELL, Galway 2, 5, 8, [23], 62, 63, 79, 80, 128;

    ‘Walt Whitman’s poetic line’ 14-27

KRAUS, Karl 136

KRAUSMANN, Rudi 99

LA MAMA 60, 100

LANGUAGE, and predisposition towards poetry 144-145, 158

LARKIN, Phillip 11, 51, 150, 158

LATERAL CHANGE 67

LATERAL LOOKING 39, 41, 67

LAWRENCE, D. H. 20, 26, 129, 135;

    ‘Tortoise Shout’ 20-21

LAWSON, Henry 104

LEAVIS, F.R. 113

LEHMANN, Geoffrey 67

LEVERTOV, Denise 55, 129

LEVIN, Harry 8

LEVI-STRAUSS, Claude 63, 113

LOCALISM 70, 73

LONGFELLOW, Henry Wadsworth 55

LONG POEM 61, 64, 157

LORCA, Federico Garcia 27, 40

LOWELL, Robert 9, 33, 35, 44, 51, 128, 137, 138, 150, [156], 170, 172;

    ‘Fetus’ 151-152

McAULEY, James 6, 53, 64

MACBETH, George 30, 39, 40

MACLEISH, Archibald 48;

    ‘You, Andrew Marvell’ 49

MAGAZINES, of poetry 44, 100, 103, 106, 110, 132

MAIDEN, Jennifer 99

MALAMUD, Bernard 3, 84, 89, 90, 92, 93, 96

MARTIN, Jay 7

MARX, Karl 42, 112, 115

MASTERS, Edgar Lee 4, [38], 49, 133, 165

MAYAKOVSKY, Vladimir 40, 127

MELVILLE, Herman 14-16, 96;

    Moby-Dick, extract from ‘A Squeeze of the Hand’ 15-16

MERRILL, James 33, 40

MERWIN, W. S. 5, 62, 162

METAPHYSICAL 33, 39

MILLAY, Edna St. Vincent 166

MILLER, J. D. B. 13

MILTON, John 55

MODELS 1, 4, 5-6, 10, 44, 59, 60, 64, 67, 105, 111, 115, 160

MODERNISM 9, 11, 22, 67, 115, 167

MODIGLIANI, Amedeo 43

MONOLOGUE FORM 4, 167-169, 172

MONRO, Harold 161

MONTALE, Eugenio 60

MOORE, Geoffrey and The Penguin Book of Modern American Verse 5, 9, 33, 44, 47, 161, 162, 165

MOORE, Marianne 33, [37], 44, 47, 48

MOORE, Merrell 35

MOVEMENT, THE 47, 104, 162

MURRAY, Les 53, 67

NATIONALISM 11, 97

NATURE 78, 123, 131

NERUDA, Pablo 10, 26

NEW AMERICAN POETRY, THE: see ALLEN, Donald

NIELSON, John Shaw 157

NIETZSCHE, Friedrich 122

NIHILISM 86, 89

NIMS, John Frederick 170, 172

NOWRA, Louis 13

OBJECTIVIST SCHOOL 74

O’DOWD, Bernard 35

O’HARA, Frank 40, 56, 62, [102], 114, 115, 128, 135, 154;

    ‘Tonight at the Versailles or Another Card, Another Cabaret’ 114

OLSON, Charles 55, 56, 128, 129, 148, 150, 151, 154, 157, 158, 159

OPPEN, George 74

OPTIMISM 59, 62, 111

ORGANIC FORM 10

ORR, Gregory 63

OXBRIDGE 12

PAROCHIALISM 90, 92, 97

PASTERNAK, Boris 123

PEARCE, Roy Harvey 6-7

PENGUIN Book of Modern American Verse, The: see MOORE, Geoffrey

PERRY, Grace 100

PERSONISM 114

PHILLIPS, A. A. 42

PICASSO, Pablo 30, 124

PLATO 2, 22, 115, 117

POE, Edgar Allan 121, 136

POETRY as an act of the mind 61

    as ethical force 80, 105-109, 111, 117, 118, 121

    existence of in our own lives 76

    expectations of 109

    and the familiar 128

    as feeling 80, 81, 124, 128, 137, 144, 162. See Bruce Dawe’s essay, ‘Public voices and private feeling’ 160-172

    format of 34, 44, 100

    humanity in 79-80, 118, 121, 127, 133, 165

    incantatory 19 and life-force 26-27

    meditation 79, 80

    mimetic art 145, 159

    as mode of apprehension 122

    as moral force 80, 106-109, 110-112, 116, 121, 122, 123, 127, 136, 165

    music of 15, 17, 20, 26-27, 80, 81, 122, 123, 138

    and the particular 73, 78. See AMERICAN POETRY, factuality, particularity as process. See AMERICAN POETRY, process

    as public voice 84-98, 160-172

    relation with

    ‘what is’ 17, 20, 26-27, 55, 62, 63, 80, 128, 131, 145

    role of 9, 26, 55, 61, 62-63, 64, 67, 76, 80, 84, 111, 123, 165, 166, 172

    as self referring fiction 105, 107-108, 110, 123

    as sensual awareness 15, 17, 20-22, 26, 122, 123

    as social force 84-98, 160-172

    as a vocation 5, 6, 61, 62, 64

    and worthwhile content 122, 123, 136

POETRY READINGS 5, 16, 60, 62, 100, 169, 171

POETRY SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA 100

POETRY WORKSHOPS 16

POLLNITZ, Christopher 110, 111, 115

POPE, Alexander 64

POUND, Ezra 11, 30, 35, 43, 44, 55, 60, 69, 70, 73, 129, 132, 134, 135, 157

PRAXIS 113

PROJECTIVE VERSE 129, 144, 148, 150

PROSE, as poetry 154

PROSE WRITERS 84-98, 137-144, 154

PURITAN IMAGINATION 6, 7, 15, 25, 89

PUTNAM, H. Phelps 47;

    ‘Hasbrouck and the Rose’ 47-48

PYBUS, Rodney 11

RADCLIFFE-BROWN, A. R. 113

RANKIN, David 100

RANSOM, John Crowe 4, 47, 50, 166, 172;

    ‘Dead Boy’ 166

REALISM 105, 106

REDGROVE, Peter 11

REGIONALISM 6, 49, 73, 165

REXROTH, Kenneth 137

REZNIKOFF, Charles 3, 122, 131-134;

    ‘Leaving the beach on a Sunday’ 133-134

RILKE, Rainer Maria 109

ROBERTS, Nigel 99, 100, 115

ROBERTS, Philip 61

ROBINSON, Edwin Arlington 4, [164], 165;

    ‘Reuben Bright’ 165

ROBINSON, Roland 100

ROETHKE, Theodore 3, 35, [46], 51, 52, 53, 128;

    ‘The Lost Son’ 52

ROMANTICISM 59, 61, 62, 105, 106

ROSENBERG, Harold 30

ROSKOLENKO, Harry 161

ROSZEWICZ, Tadeusz 118

ROTH, Phillip 3, 84, 89, 90, 91, 93;

    extract from Portnoy’s Complaint 93-94

ROUSSEAU, Henri 124

RUSSIAN WRITERS 86, 89, 95

SANDBURG, Carl 34, 166

SAROYAN, William 138

SARTRE, Jean-Paul 56, 61

SCHMIDT, Michael 150

SCHUYLER, James 122, 128

SCHWARTZ, Delmore 9, 50, 169-170;

    ‘The heavy bear who goes with me’ 50-51, 170

SCOTT, John A. 99

SERLE, Geoffrey 42

SHAKESPEARE, William 39, 64, 77, 110

SHAPCOTT, Thomas 3, 10, [31];

    ‘Beware of broken glass: models in a room of mirrors’ 28-41;

    and Contemporary American and Australian Poetry 35, 36

SHAPIRO, Karl 161, 170

SHEELER, Charles 70

SHELLEY, Percy Bysshe 117, 121, 124

SHIFT in poetic consciousness 106, 115

SILENCE, language of 85, 86, 137, 169

SIMIC, Charles 40

SIMPSON, Louis 3, 34, [71], 122, 150;

    ‘William Carlos Williams’ 69-83

SLESSOR, Kenneth 47

SNODGRASS, W. D. 172

SNYDER, Gary 122, 145-150, 151, [155];

    ‘Night Highway Ninety-nine’, excerpt 148-149;

    ‘Siwashing it out once in Siuslaw Forest’ 145-146;

    ‘A spring night in Shoku-ji’ 146-147;

    ‘A Walk’ 147-148

SOLIPSISM: see AMERICAN POETRY, subjectivity

SONNET FORM 35, 165

SOUTHERN AGRARIANS 44

SPEECH, as pre-poetry 144, 158, 159

STEIN, Gertrude 34

STEINBECK, John 138

STEINER, George 97, 109

STEVENS, Wallace 5, 9, 33, 44, 47, 48, 61, 64, 128, 135

STEVENSON, Robert Louis 123

STEWART, Douglas 40

STRAND, Mark 6, 10

STRAVINSKY, Igor 30, 43

STRUCTURALISM 112

SURREALISM 39

SWENSON, May 34

SYMONS, Arthur 49, 135

TATE, Allen 50, 143;

    extract from‘The Swimmers’ 143-144

TAYLOR, Andrew 3, 4, 5, 6, [57];

    ‘The American model: Penelope or Circe’? 54-68

TAYLOR, Ken 99

TENNYSON, Alfred Lord 1, 138

THOMAS, Dylan 34, 70, 132, 159, 162

THOREAU, Henry David 7, 14, 15, 16, 17; extract from Walden 14-15

THORNE, Tim 99, 100

TILLETT, Rob 100

TIPPING, Richard 100

TOLSTOY, Count Leo 86,

TOMLINSON, Charles 11, 150

TRANSCENDENTALISM 6-7

TRANSLATION 39

TRANTER, John 5, 61, [101];

    ‘Anaesthetics: some notes on the new Australian poetry’ 99-116;

    and The New Australian Poetry 99

TUCKERMAN, Frederick Goddard 16

TULIP, James 7-8

TURGENEV, Ivan 86, 89

UNIVERSITIES, influence on study of poetry 10-13, 55, 104, 111

VALÉRY, Paul 43

VIETNAM 59-60, 100, 104, 105, 129

VIIDIKAS, Vicki 99, 100

WALEY, Arthur 10

WALDMAN, Anne 36

WALLACE-CRABBE, Chris 3, 4, 5, 8, [45], 61, 162;

    ‘The Quaker graveyard in Carlton’ 42-53

WARREN, Robert Penn 2, 50, 137, 138-143, 154;

   extract from All the King’s Men 141-142

WEARNE, Alan 99

WEBB, Francis 51

WHITE, Richard 12-13

WHITMAN, Walt 1-2, 7, 8, 10, 14-27, [24], 33, 35, 36, 59, 69, 79, 80, 122-127, 131, 138, 149;

    ‘Faces’ 125-126;

    ‘Reconciliation’ 27;

    Song of Myself 17-18, 21-22, 25-26;

   ‘When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom’d’ 19

WILBUR, Richard 9, 33, 34, 170, 172

WILDE, Oscar 64, 135

WILLIAMS, William Carlos 3, 9, 33, 69-83, [72], 122, 127-131, 132, 138, 149-150;

    extract from ‘Asphodel’ 82-83;

    ‘Christmas 1950’ 76-77;

    ‘Iris’ 81;

    excerpt from Paterson 129-131;

    ‘This is Just to Say’ 74-75

WORDSWORTH, William 3, 55, 76, 78, 92, 144, 154

WRIGHT, James 5, 62, 64, 118, 137

YEATS, W. B. 22, 103, 157, 162

ZUKOFSKY, Louis 74

ZWICKY, Fay 3, 4, 5, [87];

    ‘Democratic repression and the admission of difference: the ethnic strain’ 84-98

List of Contributors

These Contributor Notes are taken from the 1982 book, and are contemporary with that date.

VINCENT BUCKLEY holds a Chair in English at Melbourne University. One of Australia’s leading poets and literary critics, he is at present in Ireland for three years on a writer’s grant. His latest volumes of poetry are Late Winter Child and The Pattern.

BRUCE DAWE is an Australian poet who teaches at Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education at Toowoomba, Queensland. He was winner of the 1980 Patrick White award for literature. His latest book of poetry is his collected poems, Sometimes Gladness.

ROBERT GRAY is an Australian poet and critic with strong ties to the North Coast where he was born. He is a poetry reviewer for the Sydney Morning Herald and the ABC. His latest volume of poetry is Grass Script.

GALWAY KINNELL is an American poet who was writer-in-residence at Macquarie University in 1979. At present he divides his time between the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and an old farmhouse in Vermont. His latest book of poetry is Mortal Acts, Mortal Words.

JOAN KIRKBY teaches American Literature and Modernism at Macquarie University. Active in organizing poetry and fiction readings at Macquarie, she has published on American topics from Hawthorne to Heller.

THOMAS SHAPCOTT is an Australian poet, anthologist and critic living in Queensland. As a Churchill Fellow he has travelled widely in the USA and Britain. He is editor of Contemporary American and Australian Poetry. His latest book of poetry is Stump & Grape & Bopple-Nut.

LOUIS SIMPSON is an American poet who was writer-in-residence at the University of New England in 1979. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for At the End of the Open Road, he is on the staff of the University of New York at Buffalo. His latest book of poetry is Caviar at the Funeral.

ANDREW TAYLOR is an Australian poet who teaches in the Department of English at Adelaide University. He has spent several years studying and writing in Italy and the USA. His latest book of poems is The Crystal Absences; the Trout.

JOHN TRANTER is an Australian poet, anthologist and publisher living in Sydney. He is editor of The New Australian Poetry. His latest book of poetry is Dazed in the Ladies Lounge.

CHRIS WALLACE-CRABBE, an Australian poet and critic, is a Reader in English at the University of Melbourne. He has been a Harkness Fellow at Yale University and Visiting Fellow at Exeter. His latest book of poetry is The Emotions Are Not Skilled Workers.

FAY ZWICKY is an Australian poet, short story writer and critic based at the Department of English, University of Western Australia. Her most recent book of poetry is Kaddish and Other Poems.