Category Archives: Knick-knacks

Bit and pieces of miscellanea, or little thoughts that didn’t seem to fit anywhere else

Norman Rockwell and Richard Nixon

Norman Rockwell had also met with the Republican nominee, Vice President Richard Nixon. As much as he admired President Eisenhower, Rockwell did not care for his vice president. In his studio, he worked on the portraits of Senator Kennedy and Vice President Nixon side by side. Scrupulously objective, he made sure that neither candidate flashed a millimeter more of a smile than the other. It was tedious work, not least because Nixon’s face posed unique challenges. As Peter Rockwell recalled, “My father said the problem with doing Nixon is that if you make him look nice, he doesn’t look like Nixon anymore.”

rockwell-nixon-kennedy.jpg

From: The Smithsonian magazine, October 2013, “Inside America’s Great Romance With Norman Rockwell”, by Deborah Solomon, at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Inside-Americas-Great-Romance-With-Norman-Rockwell-224937822.html?c=y&story=fullstory#norman-rockwell-1.jpg

The Dream-Master’s Knick-Knacks

The Dream-Master’s Knick-Knacks: Loretta Howard Gallery is pleased to present John Ashbery Collects, an immersive multi-media gallery experience showcasing a selection of things that inform Ashbery’s sensibility as well as his work as a poet, visual artist, collaborator, art critic and collector. Co-curated by poets Adam Fitzgerald and Emily Skillings, John Ashbery Collects explores the poet’s lifelong interest in collecting through the medium of his late-19th century house in Hudson, NY, a carefully composed collage-environment constructed over thirty-five years with an eclectic array of fine art by European and American masters, furniture, pottery, textiles, bric-a-brac, toys, and other objects, augmented by the content and associations that these objects hold for him—the images and artworks he arranges on his walls, the books he puts on his shelves, the music he plays, the cinema he watches—all organized in an architecturally-distinguished setting. Loretta Howard Gallery · 525-531 West 26th Street, New York, NY 10001 · (212) 695-0164 AT: http://www.lorettahoward.com/content/john-ashbery-poet-among-things

ashbery-porter

Sayings of the Poets

Poets are supposed to write memorable lines. What about baseball players? Some sayings of the great Yogi Berra, from Wikipedia:

»» As a general comment on baseball: “90% of the game is half mental.”
»» On why he no longer went to Ruggeri’s, a St. Louis restaurant: “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.”
»» “It ain’t over ’til it’s over.” In July 1973, Berra’s Mets trailed the Chicago Cubs by 9½ games in the National League East. The Mets rallied to win the division title on the final day of the season.
»» When giving directions to Joe Garagiola to his New Jersey home, which is accessible by two routes: “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”
»» On being the guest of honor at an awards banquet: “Thank you for making this day necessary.”
»» “It’s déjà vu all over again”. Berra explained that this quote originated when he witnessed Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris repeatedly hit back-to-back home runs in the Yankees’ seasons in the early 1960s.
»» “You can observe a lot by watching.”
»» “Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t go to yours.”

Berra_Yogi_plaque

Coonhounds

I can’t resist a photo of a cute dog, in this case a coon-hound called “Maddie”. Or is it that I can’t resist cute photos of dogs? In any case, this shot is from www.http://maddieonthings.com/ , or from www.maddieontour.com , credit: all images are © by theronhumphrey.

flying-super-maddie-on-cart

I Yam what I Yam

popeye

This will have to do for a motto.

[Mind you, Popeye's motto is the same as (or perhaps a riposte to) "tat tvam asi", ( Sanskrit: “thou art that”) in Hinduism, the famous expression of the relationship between the individual and the Absolute. The statement is frequently repeated in the sixth chapter of the Chandogya Upanishad (c. 600 bce) as the teacher Uddalaka Aruni instructs his son in the nature of brahman, the supreme reality. (Encyclopaedia Britannica)]

Mind you, whenever I say “mind you”, sententiousness follows!