The Hair Part Theory

Stuart Freeborn, centre.
Stuart Freeborn, centre. Click on the image to see a larger, sharper image; ditto to return here.

The makeup artist Stuart Freeborn died in London on 5 February 2013, at the age of 98. He started out in 1936 and spent a long career in the movies, working on such classic movies as «2001: A Space Odyssey», «Superman», and «The Omen». He created three different identities for Peter Sellers in Stanley Kubrick’s satire «Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb».

Friend and fellow makeup-artist Nick Maley writes “The link between the apes of «A Space Odyssey» and the creatures of «Star Wars» is so close […] between the two there were other projects such as Sir Richard Attenborough’s «Oh! What a Lovely War», «10 Rillington Place» and «Young Winston» where I first joined Stuart’s team. Quick to follow were «Inside the Third Reich», plus the huge prosthetic endeavor «Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland», more characters for Peter Sellers in «Soft Beds, Hard Battles», a gelaten aging for «Murder on the Orient Express», followed by «The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother» and the spooky thriller «The Omen».”

Freeborn designed Superman and Clark Kent as two quite separate people, parting Clark Kent’s hair on the right and Superman’s on the left. Perhaps he was a disciple of Catherine Walter and her brother John Walter, authors of «The Effects of Hair Parting on Social Appraisal and Personal Development» (see http://www.truemirror.com/hp/hpttmc.asp) where they write:

Surprisingly, a hair part has a crucial impact on interpersonal relationships by affecting immediate character appraisal, perceived personality traits, self-perception and self-development!

The Hair Part Theory was developed by a brother-sister team trained, respectively, in nuclear physics and cultural anthropology. Their revolutionary theory is now being made available to the general public, so that all individuals can have more control over automatic and mostly unconscious assessments made of their personalities by others. John and Catherine Walter also produce the True Mirror®, a mirror that does not reverse the viewer’s image and which therefore allows an accurate self-assessment.

superman-hair-part

A left hair part draws unconscious attention to the activities that are controlled by the left hemisphere of the brain, i.e. activities traditionally attributed to masculinity. A right hair part draws unconscious attention to the activities that are controlled by the right hemisphere of the brain, i.e. activities traditionally attributed to femininity.

Apart from Superman’s hair, Freeborn was noted for his creation of the character Yoda, based partly, he said, on Albert Einstein. Others — clever people! — saw a similarity with Freeborn himself. See photo above.